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Old 02-18-2004, 07:21 AM   #11 (permalink)
 
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OK LISTEN UP. This fungi does NOT FALL FROM THE HAIR. It is caused by a buildup of sweat and oil on the SKIN. Hair does cause this but it's just because you sweat around hairy areas. I get this on my stomach and chest and no hair there (bzzzzzzzzzzz). I also have a family member that is COMPLETELY BALD and gets it. It is hereditary and that's it. All those fungi products work. The problem is that it takes WEEKS of treatment to make it subside. Miss 1 treatment and you start over. You can never really get rid of it totally.
Once again, Mouthybrat, your posts seem to be just made up. Did you even take 2 seconds to research? Here's what I found in .10seconds (literally):

Tinea versicolor is a common skin condition due to overgrowth of a skin surface yeast. This overgrowth results in uneven skin color and scaling that can be unsightly and sometimes itch. The yeast normally lives in the pores of the skin and thrives in oily areas such as the neck, upper chest, and back.

What does tinea versicolor look like and how do you recognize it?

Tinea versicolor has small, scaly white-to-pink or tan-to-dark spots which can be scattered over the upper arms, chest and back. They may sometimes appear on the neck and the face. On light skin, tinea versicolor may be faint or can appear as tan-to-pink spots, while on dark skin tinea versicolor may be light or dark. The fungus grows slowly and prevents the skin from tanning normally. As the rest of the skin tans in the sun, the pale spots, which are affected by the yeast, become more noticeable, especially on dark skin.

What are the symptoms?

Tinea versicolor usually produces few symptoms. Occasionally, there is some slight itching that is more intense when a person gets hot.

Who may get this rash?

Most people get tinea versicolor when they are teenagers or young adults. It is rare in the elderly and children, except in tropical climates where it can occur at any age. Both dark and light skinned people are equally prone to its development. People with oily skin may be more susceptible than those with naturally dry skin.

The yeast is normally present in small numbers on everyone's skin. Anyone can develop an overgrowth of yeast. During the summer months when the temperature and humidity are high, the yeast can increase. The excess yeast on the skin prevents the normal pigmentation process, resulting in light and dark spots. In tropical countries with continuous high heat and high humidity, people can have these spots year round. In other climates, the spots generally fade in the cooler and drier months of the year. Why some people get tinea versicolor and others do not is unclear.

In tropical countries with continuous high heat and high humidity, people can have these spots year round. In other climates, the spots generally fade in the cooler and drier months of the year.

How is tinea versicolor diagnosed?

Although the light or dark colored spots can resemble other skin conditions, tinea versicolor can be easily recognized by a dermatologist. In most cases, the appearance of the skin is diagnostic, but a simple examination of the fine scales scraped from the skin can confirm the diagnosis. Scales are lightly scraped onto a slide and examined under a microscope for the presence of the yeast. A special light may help to make the diagnosis by showing a yellow green color where the skin is affected.

How is it treated?

Tinea versicolor is treated with topical or oral medications. Topical treatment includes special cleansers including some shampoos, creams, or lotions applied directly to the skin.

Several oral medications have been used successfully to treat tinea versicolor. Because of possible side effects, or interactions with other medications, the use of these prescription medicines should be supervised by your dermatologist. After any form of treatment, the uneven color of the skin may remain several months after the yeast has been eliminated until the skin repigments normally.

Tinea versicolor may recur. Special cleansers may decrease episodes when used once or twice a month, especially during warm humid months of the year.

Each patient is treated by the dermatologist according to the severity and location of the disease, the climate, and the desire of the patient. It’s important to remember that the yeast is easy to kill, but it can take weeks or months for the skin to regain its normal color.

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Old 02-18-2004, 08:21 AM   #12 (permalink)
 
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Quote: WHAT CAUSES THE TINY WHITE SPOTS, OR SUN SPOTS?

Tinea Versicolor, a skin condition that affects tanners, is caused by a microscopic fungus from the scalp. This fungus falls onto arms, shoulders and other body parts and leaves bleached areas on the skin, which can spread. It is treatable and must be protected from further ultraviolet light exposure until those bleached areas have begun developing melanin again.

found here:
http://www.nstanning.com/tanning_qa.html

There is more, but I don't have time right now to post it all.


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Old 02-18-2004, 08:59 AM   #13 (permalink)
 
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Also, as a point of information, I got my information from the training manual from The International Smart Tan Network. We used to be members of Smart Tan and I believe that the information was in their Fifth Edition of their manual. That has been several years (1997-1998) and since we are no longer members of Smart Tan, we have thrown away all of the manuals and we no longer have access to the members section of the website to try to find it there.

Obvioulsly, I am not the only person who had that information, because I found it on several tanning salon websites (most of which are members of Smart Tan).

Engfant, while I do think that your research is correct, because I did do a search online, I was simply stating what I had learned as a past member of Smart Tan. I have not done any research on sun spots since, and apparently the information has changed. To imply that I "made it up" is simply immature. If I do not feel that I have correct information on a topic, I don't post anything or I find information about it. I do not "make up" stuff to post, as this is a site where people need truthful information and it would be irresponsible for anyone to simply "make up" an answer.
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Old 02-18-2004, 09:11 PM   #14 (permalink)
 
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Listen April (if that IS your real name) you have seem to have read every tanning guide and only remembered the parts that are GROSSLY INCORRECT and nothing else. This isn't a tanning disease that was just discovered by Smart Tan. All us grease balls have been getting it forever. Has anyone ever even heard of a fungi that is spread like this? How about this? COMMON SENSE? Or even better Google?
Like I said, it took me .10seconds to find the EXACT description of what this via search engine. You claim this is "a site where people need truthfull information" Don't you see that not only is what you said incorrect you preach it to be the truth even though it's NOT EVEN CLOSE. (Not to mention your WACKED OUT perception on tanning lotion usage) If it was made up you could at least say it was a joke.
I cannot believe you are a moderator. Is there some sort of qualifications for this icon? Can you make me a dunce cap icon because if Mouthybrat is representation of what a tanning professional is I gotta be the biggest fool.
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Old 08-07-2004, 07:17 PM   #15 (permalink)
 
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i have a customer that only has them on her abdomen. Her arms and neck and back are clear. Is this the same thing?
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Old 08-08-2004, 01:35 AM   #16 (permalink)
 
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Engfant...I know this discussion is old, and not trying to argue with you because I believe you are right....but, I also read this about a fungus falling from the hair onto the skin in the Smart Tan Book. This is also what I believed to be the problem til I read your post- thankyou for the good info. Maybe Smart Tan needs to change their information in their book.
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Old 08-08-2004, 10:37 AM   #17 (permalink)
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I am with cutting edge. When I had traning seminars when I first started working in Tanning, that is what I was trained as well...hair fungus.
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Old 08-08-2004, 11:38 AM   #18 (permalink)
 
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I will do (a little) research on this "hair fungus" but remember. Just Google it if ever in doubt. HOPEFULLY they wern't calling it tinea versiclor (the hair fungus) cause that is not correct.

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Old 08-09-2004, 03:08 AM   #19 (permalink)
 
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I'll check my book tomorrow-it was in the back under 'frequently asked questions' and 'why do I have white spots'---or something like that. I'll post back. Ther were 3 reasons for white spots. OK nevermind-I just found it on their website-copied it below. 2nd paragrapgh.



Quote:Why do some of my customers get white spots? There are several reasons that a person will begin to develop white spots. One common reason is vitiligo, which is characterized by irregularly shaped white patches of skin, surrounded by dark borders. The white patches are sensitive to UV exposure.60 Doctors will often use a lotion based form of psoralen (an extremely photosensitizing agent) and induce up to second degree burns on the specific areas. This in effect reactivates dormant melanocyte cells into producing melanin again. In time the white areas will gradually begin to match the surrounding areas.

Another cause for white spots is fungus known as tinea versicolor. This fungus actually develops in the hair and falls primarily onto the upper body like dandruff. (However, this is not dandruff.) The affected areas prevent the skin from tanning and, as a result, create white spots. There, is a home remedy—shampoos like extra strength Selsun Blue or extra strength Head and Shoulders carry a special ingredient that is very effective at removing these white spots over time.

The third cause for white spots is caused by how a person lies in the tanning bed. Three areas of the body are affected by how a person lies in the tanning bed: shoulder blades, tail bone area, and the backs of the calves. What happens is that pressure is created on those areas of the body, which restricts blood flow. A person needs UVA and UVB in order to tan; however, they also need oxygen. (Those who sleep in tanning beds often get these white spots.) There is a simple way to minimize and even eliminate this condition—have your customers take their right forearm (not their elbow and not the heel of their hand) and the bottom of their right foot and push up gently for a few seconds. This will relieve pressure on the right hand side of their body, allowing their skin to breathe for a few moments. After they have done this, they should lower their right side and raise the left side up the same way.


Here's the link:
http://www.saloncertification.com/appendix.htm

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Old 08-09-2004, 10:29 AM   #20 (permalink)
 
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I KNEW those certs were a CROCK.

Googled "tinea versicolor" and in .44 seconds pulled up a link to the correct definition:

Next time you're at the beach (wearing a hat and sunscreen, of course!), look for tanned people with faded spots on their shoulders, back, and/or chest. Chances are they have tinea versicolor.

What is tinea versicolor?

Tinea versicolor is a fungus infection that mainly affects the skin of young people. This common condition is unsightly, but it is neither permanent nor serious. Spots can be either light- or reddish- brown or else lighter than the surrounding skin (hence, the name "versicolor"). There may be just a few spots, or there can be so many that they run together (like a shawl) and make it seem that islands of normal skin color are the spots, not the other way around.

What causes tinea versicolor?

The cause of this condition is a yeast called Pityrosporum orbiculare (which also is known as Malassezia furfur). This yeast is lipophilic, which means it likes fat. This explains why the condition is common on areas of the body that have a lot of sebaceous (oil) glands; mainly the chest, back, and shoulders. Sometimes, a few stray spots appear on the arms, legs, or groin. For some reason (fortunately!), the face rarely is affected.

This yeast is actually a normal resident of our skin. Factors like heat, humidity, and sweat help it proliferate in some people, resulting in a visible rash. Tinea versicolor is not contagious. Mostly, the condition appears in warm weather, or, at any rate, becomes noticeable only when we wear more revealing clothes and the sun tans the rest of the skin and highlights the parts affected by fungus.

What other conditions resemble tinea versicolor?

Conditions that look a little like tinea versicolor but are really quite different include:

Pityriasis alba. This is a mild form of eczema seen in young people that produces mild, patchy lightening of the face, shoulders, or torso.
Vitiligo. This condition results in a permanent loss of pigment. Vitiligo is more likely to affect the skin around the eyes and lips, or the knuckles and joints. Spots are porcelain-white and are permanent.
How is tinea versicolor treated?

There are many antifungal agents available to apply to the skin for the treatment of tinea versicolor. Over-the-counter (OTC) remedies include clotrimazole, miconazole, and selenium sulfide shampoo (e.g., Selsum Blue). (There are a large number of OTC products that contain these medications. Check the label carefully.) These solutions are difficult to apply to large areas, however, and this makes it easy to miss spots.

Oral treatment for tinea versicolor is much simpler. A single dose of ketoconazole (brand name: Nizoral) or 5 daily doses of itraconazole (brand name: Sporanox) are two therapies your doctor can recommend.

What happens after the tinea versicolor has been treated?

The rash of tinea versicolor tends to linger even after successful treatment. Perhaps the most common reason for thinking successful treatment has failed is that even when all the fungi are dead, light or white spots persist. It generally takes months for them to blend in with the surrounding skin. The red or brown variety of rash, by contrast, clears up visually right away. It is therefore a good idea to be treated as soon as new spots appear so that the discoloration lasts as short a time as possible.

Recurrence of the rash is all but inevitable, though it won't recur necessarily every year. Fortunately, the incidence of recurrence declines with age.
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