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Old 04-10-2003, 11:59 PM   #1 (permalink)
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The ingredients below are comedogenic, which means that they clog pores and can cause blackheads, pimples, or cosmetics-related acne . You may be wondering why these substances are used in cosmetics at all if they clog the skin. The answer? They're cheap!
Most people don't realize that even lipsticks, eye creams and hair pomades can spread to the surrounding skin and cause breakouts. Be sure to check the ingredients list on your cleansers, moisturizers, makeup, and sunscreens, and avoid these potentially pore-clogging ingredients if your skin is prone to breakouts. Instead, look for the good alternative ingredients listed here.
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Cocoa butter, isopropyl myristate: Found in sunscreen, moisturizer , massage cream, lipstick, blush, body lotion. Good alternatives: plant oils (except coconut), kalaya oil, vegetable glycerine, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, butylene glycol (these are partially petroleum-based but formulated not to clog oily skin)

-cinnamates, -salicylates, octyl palmitate, PABA: Found in sunscreen. Good alternatives: titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, Parsol 1789

Shea butter: Found in moisturizer , soap, shampoo. Good alternatives: plant oils (except coconut), kalaya oil, vegetable glycerine, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, butylene glycol

Coconut oil, lanolin: Found in moisturizer , soap, shampoo, hair conditioner, pomade, massage cream, body lotion, blush, eye cream, foundation, cold cream, lipstick. Good alternatives: plant oils (except coconut), kalaya oil, vegetable glycerine, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, butylene glycol

Mineral oil: Found in most inexpensive drugstore cleansers, moisturizers, and makeup; cold cream; eye cream; hair conditioner; sunscreen; makeup remover. Good alternatives: plant oils (except coconut), kalaya oil, vegetable glycerine, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, butylene glycol

Petrolatum: Found in moisturizer , cold cream, balm, wax depilatories, eye shadow, blush, cream, foundation, lipstick, baby-care products. Good alternatives: beeswax, jojoba wax, carnauba wax, candelilla wax

Paraffin: Found in cold cream, wax depilatories, eye shadow, blush, cream foundation, lipstick, baby-care products. Good alternatives: beeswax, jojoba wax, carnauba wax, candelilla wax.

D&C Red dyes, FD&C Red dyes: Found in blush, lipstick, powder. Good alternatives: carmine, annatto, cochineal powder, caramel, grapeskin extract, iron oxide.


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[ This Message was edited by: ElectricSunFreak on 2003-04-11 00:04 ]
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Old 04-11-2003, 07:34 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Shea butter? Really? This is the best stuff I've ever come across. No way am I going to give it up. My skin has never been in better shape since I started using it.
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Old 04-11-2003, 08:42 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Dear Skin Care Guests:

Thank-you Electric, for your post here……it really can open up a great topic thread for this area…
In regards to the above post though, I found that some of the statements posted here needs to be looked at.


" The ingredients below are comedogenic, which means that they clog pores and can
cause blackheads, pimples, or cosmetics-related acne . You may be wondering why
these substances are used in cosmetics at all if they clog the skin. The answer? They're
cheap!" quoted from Electic Sun Freak


Let us take a look at the skin itself 1st then determine if this post stands as an opinion or truth based with facts. .

More quotes:
" Be sure to check the ingredients list on
your cleansers, moisturizers, makeup, and sunscreens, and avoid these potentially
pore-clogging ingredients if your skin is prone to breakouts. Instead, look for the good
alternative ingredients listed here.
----------------------
Cocoa butter, isopropyl myristate: Found in sunscreen, moisturizer , massage cream,
lipstick, blush, body lotion. Good alternatives: plant oils (except coconut), kalaya oil,
vegetable glycerine, propylene glycol, polyethylene glycol, butylene glycol (these are
partially petroleum-based but formulated not to clog oily skin) "

Let us discuss a bit….
The primary path for a chemicals penetration of the coreum layer is through lipid containing intercellular spaces…… Best way to get a product to penetrate is through occlusion ( the trapping of the liquid or gas… in this case in the corneum) that prevents surface evaporation…

You must some how mix an oil with an oil based chemicals….this will penetrate more easily through the epidermal layers.


We know that the corneum layer of our skin with its strongly bonded cells is the greatest obstacle to a product that needs to penetrate.

The 2nd barrier is the epidermal-dermal junction,, ( I call it the basement membrane )

If the one skins function is to serve as a barrier, (protecting the body from penetrating foreign matter how is that chemical or property of a product or cosmetic ingredients penetrating?
We know structurally the skin absorbs……..
The absorbtion takes place through the pilosebaceous pores, the ducts of the sweat glands, the intercellular channels that bind cells together.

In true reality..a large percentage of topically applied products never penetrate the corneum layer due to some of the reasons I'll tell you.

1. molecular size ( too big)
2. retention or the binding on the surface by other properties that are involved in the product.
3. adhesion to the surface cells of the corneum and then lost by exfoliation..
4. evaporation (if volatile at a regular temperature)


Coco Butter has been around for many centuries…as well as some of the other items Electic listed.
I for one like Cocoa Butter on my feet and my hands…….but prefer a more quality care ingredient on my skin, yet I look at Mrs. Dowling 79 years old and she uses her Coco Butter twice a day, and she looks very very good…..
Shea butter……..aka( hydrodispersible)….is an EXCELLENT emollient… creams make-ups and lotions……it alleviates dryness of the skin…..its known to have sun protection and penetrates very very well

There are very wonderful products on the market that contain some or all of these ingredients that were written about in this post.

We can discuss as many of them as you like.
If you use a product and get a reaction to it…..I suggest you discontinue use.
If you are using a product that contains some of these ingredients…..and it is working for you……..I say continue using it.

You know your skin better than any one else………
The whole idea of good skin care is to look good, feel great!!!!

I hope we can continue this discussion,
C
xoxoxox
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Old 04-11-2003, 09:14 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I can't remember where I got that list from but I was curious myself about some of them since i know everyone has rave reviews about Shae Butter and I myself have a moisturizer that has cocoa butter in it and find it really keeps me moisturized. I myself have problem skin (oily with tendency to breakout and blackheads) so I wouldn't use these products on my face. I thought it was interesting and wanted to get some comments on it. I didn't know how true some of thses statements were. As for anything thats in that post it is entirely someone elses opinion not mine! I myself know I use products with some of these ingredients and they work well but figured it was worth posting if someone was having trouble with their skin...that way they may take a closer look at the products they are using and eliminate the ones with some of these ingredients to see if it helps. I appreciate comments or corrections because I myself am always lookign for ways to treat my skin better! I totally agree with fungirlz...if it works for you then continue using it....but if your skin seems to be blemish prone then it wouldn't hurt to check the ingrdients on the products you use.
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Old 04-11-2003, 09:18 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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Are these just things you mean to not put on your face? I thought cocoa butter was good for stretch marks. And I've heard that shea butter, in small amounts and not combined with anything else, was good for preventing wrinkles around the eyes. Or is it kola nut butter that does that?

Mineral oil, coconut oil, and petroleum (wich is actually derived from petro-oil) are all gross. When I was little my mom used to use vasoline to take off her eye makeup and it would gross me out time after time. It's one of those things that you can feel blocking your pores. I used coconut oil as a shimmer for my eyelids once and, although it looked cool, it felt so disgusting, like there were toxins trying to get out of my skin and they were trapped or something.
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Old 04-11-2003, 09:29 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Here is a list with bad and good ingredients....I have recently gotten so curious about all of this while trying to make my skin look and feel better...very interesting.

http://www.rimart.com/harmtech/0490.pdf

"If you find it on the internet...it must be true!" Just kidding!
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Old 04-11-2003, 09:40 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Be sure you only use products made for eye when removing make-up...
Baby Oil and jellys are not designed for the eye area...You can harm your eye if you are not careful..
Pick a quality eye make-up remover even if you have pay a little more for it..

Be wise when working in the eye area....
Some glitters are made for the body..not the eyes...be sure the glitter you are wearing on the eye area is indeed made for the eyes...........

C
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Old 04-11-2003, 09:55 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Hey Christine.....I know this post will be entirely too long LOL but I was wondering if you could read over it when you get time to and let me know how much truth their is to this article I found. It is very explanatory and doesn't seem far fetched but I am no skin expert so your feedback is appreciated Thanks!
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Cosmetics & Acne
War on the beauty and health of the human skin. The biggest campaigns ever waged.

Some people's make-up becomes a cover-up both physically and psychologically. They begin using such heavy make-up that part of their acne problem is acne cosmetics.

The beauty and health of the human skin is being undermined by one of the biggest campaigns ever waged in the history of merchandising. Every day on television, radio, magazine and newspapers, we are encouraged to put aside basic skin care ingredients like soap and water in favor of such complexion "aids" as cleansing creams, night creams, daytime moisturizers, face foundations and rouges.

While some people have skin capable of withstanding the damaging effects of cosmetics, an estimated 30% of all cosmetic users have skin which is acne prone.

Women and men alike, in their teens, twenties and even early thirties, are potential candidates for cosmetic acne. The condition is characterized by many elevated small whiteheads appearing over the cheeks and chin and sometimes the forehead. While cosmetic acne seldom leaves scars, it can be unsightly, persistent and troublesome. The skin's pores have a tough time dealing with the skin's own oil sebum, so rubbing in more irritating oils is one of the worst things you can do.

Even people who are not acne sufferers can actually develop acne through the use of their cosmetics. Since cosmetic acne usually appears subtly after several months of repeated use of a comedogenic (acne-producing) product, many women do not connect their outbreaks with the given product. The woman with cosmetic acne is in a vicious cycle; the more she breaks out, the more make-up she uses to cover it up... which only leads to more blemishes.

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Advertising confuses the issue. "Oil Free"--the Darling of Madison Avenue.

"Oil free" is fast becoming a favorite term of the cosmetic industry. Many cosmetic manufacturers are substituting chemicals which, legally speaking, are not considered oil free simply because they come from synthetic sources rather than from natural sources, i.e., animal, vegetable or mineral.

These synthetic oils, however, are often more acne producing than a natural oil such as mineral oil. Advertising claims for many cosmetic terms such as "oil free," "dermatologist tested" and "hypoallergenic" can be very misleading. Hypo-allergenic may mean the product is perfume-free, yet it could still contain ingredients harmful to acne-prone individuals. "Dermatologist-tested" may be accurate but not entirely helpful. The product may have been tested for skin allergy or skin irritancy and it's effects on skin pores may have been missed.

The Oil Migration Test.
Not all "oil-free" moisturizers for cosmetics are oil free; some contain oil-like synthetics that can provoke acne-prone skin. How to tell? Dab the moisturizer on good-quality stationery (imprinted 25% cotton fiber). Twenty-four hours later, hold the paper up to daylight and check for oil rings. The extent of migration will correspond to the percent of oil in the cosmetic.

The oil migration test is useful to deduct certain oils in cosmetics, but it is more important to learn to read the labels and avoid troublesome ingredients. Remember, not all oils are bad. Petrolatum and some lighter oils like mineral oil and sunflower oil don't penetrate down into the pore.

What ingredients in cosmetics cause acne?
After the frustration of watching precipitate acne in many acne patients, chemists at Lacofar laboratory began testing the basic ingredients of more than 200 cosmetics to determine their effects on skin pores.

A word about sebum
Before we discuss cosmetic ingredients, we should consider the skin's own surface oil, sebum. Assuming that sebum is beneficial to the skin, cosmetic chemists have duplicated this substance. Unfortunately, however, we know of no benefits to be derived from sebum. This oil is simply a vestige whose function has been lost in the process of evolution. The last known use of sebum was a territorial make for male gerbils and hamsters.

The claim that sebum is necessary for moisturizing the skin is a little bit absurd when you consider that the finest skin is found in eight-year-old boys and eunuchs, neither of whom have any sebum.

Sebum does not even prevent wrinkles. Wrinkling, or aging of the skin, is a reflection of accumulated sun damage, and no moisturizer in the world is capable of reversing this exhaustion of tissues. Although functionless, sebum is complex, composed of six or seven principle ingredients, including triglycerides and squalene, a precursor of cholesterol. The triglycerides are broken down on the surface of the skin by bacteria to free fatty acids, which cause acne impactions in genetically predisposed families.

As we shall see, many cosmetics also contain these acids; but worse, cosmetics contain esters of fatty acids such as isopropyl mystrate or butyl stearate which are more potent even than our own fatty acids in the production of some acne lesions.

Three main categories of offending ingredient
1.Lanolins
Lanolin is, perhaps, the most common ingredient in cosmetics. Lanolin is simply sheep skin oil extracted from wool. The fatty acids in lanolin, like fatty acids in our own oil, tend to aggravate some acne in the skin of individuals with genetic tendency toward the disorder. Many lanolin derivatives currently being used in cosmetics are harmful to acne-prone individuals, i.e., etoxylated lanolins and acetylated lanolins. The partially synthetic lanolins are able to penetrate skin pores even better than natural lanolin. Lanolin oil, itself, is acceptable.

2.Isopropyl Myristate and it's Chemical Cousins
One of the worse offenders is a penetrating oil called isopropyl myristate, the major ingredient in a can of penetrating rust remover, Liquid Wrench. Isopropyl Myristate helps cosmetics apply more smoothly and gives them a slicker, sheer feel. This particular penetrating oil is so aggressive that if left over night in a beaker will actually migrate over the top, down the sides and onto the table top. There are may chemicals similar to isopropyl myristate in cosmetics. The most common are: isopropyl palmitate, isopropyl isothermal, putty sterate, isostearyl neopentonate, myristyl myristate, decyl oleate, octyl sterate, octyl palmitate and isocetyl stearate and PPG myristyl propionate. All must be avoided, as must other surfactants such as laureth-4.

3.Drug & Cosmetic Pigments
Perhaps one the most troublesome recent findings about acne-producing potential is the red tints used in blushes. Some of the Drug & Cosmetic red dyes are comedogenic, which is not surprising considering they are coal tar derivatives. Ever since doctors noticed that acne was an occupational hazard of chimney sweeps, coal tar has been known for it's acne-causing properties.

An acceptable substitute for red color is carmine, a dye derived from insect wings and discovered by the Aztecs.

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Currently acceptable cosmetics, moisturizers and hair pomades

Cosmetics
Almay-Fresh Look Oil Free
Clinique-Pore Minimizer
Elizabeth Arden-Oil Free Make-up
Flori Roberts-Dermablend
Lancôme-Maqui Controle

Mild Cleansing Bar or Liquid

Dove, Neutrogena, Basis, Purpose, or Cetaphil



Moisturizers
Mineral and Petroleum Oil
Safflower and Sunflower Oil

Linseed oil - Sesame seed oil - Walnut oil

Many of the popular moisturizers are also acne producing. DO NOT USE COMMERCIAL MOISTURIZERS. Moisturizers contain chemicals that are absorbed in your skin to attract water, which may lead to an increased water-pressure in the true skin, which pinches off sebum canals, causing acne if also much sebum is produced.

Protect your outer skin from dehydration with a fingertip of OIL. Spread a bit of oil all over your face after you have made it a tiny little bit moist by spraying some low mineral bottle water with a plant spray (not so much that drops are formed; just that you feel it but don't clearly see it).

Natural moisturizers made at home: Ingredients: one banana. Mash a banana with a fork...don't over mash or it will be too runny. Add honey if desired. Smooth over skin, let sit for 10 minutes, rinse off with cool water.

Cosmetic moisturizers do not moisturize the skin, but only block the normal loss of water from the skin's surface. For very dry skin that has excessive water loss, these products can be helpful for a time. But they also hydrate (wet) and loosen the skin's protective outer proteins and degrade the protective qualities of these proteins. The only way the skin can truly be moisturized is via the skin's internal synthesis of new proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) which hold water in the skin.

Elicina, as the snail's substance it is made off, contains collagen which temporarily attracts moisture to your skin. And allantoin which speeds the formation of new collagen and elastin cells that give the skin strength and elasticity. Elicina also speeds the formation of proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans (proteins and molecules) that restore the water holding properties of healthy skin. The only true skin moisturizing is via these water-holding molecules.

Cosmetic products that contain collagen, or elastin, or DNA have no effect on the skin's production of collagen and elastin, and have no effect on the skin's firmness or elasticity, and also have no effect on the rate of skin renewal. They only serve to attract water to the surface of the skin.

Only collagen and elastin that is produced within the skin helps improve skin firmness and elasticity.

Hair Pomades
Drest, Dep, Afro Sheen
Mineral Oil and Petrolatum



Don’t be afraid to hide blemishes with flesh- tinted cover-ups or even foundation, as long at it is water-based.

Foundation For Oily Skin
Bath & Body Works Cream to Powder Foundation
Bobbi Brown Oil-Free Foundation
Body & Soul Powder Foundation
L'Oreal Colour Endure Light Stay-On Makeup Oil Free
Stila Illuminating Powder Foundation

Foundation For Dry Skin
Bobbi Brown Foundation Stick
Estee Lauder Impeccable

Foundation For All Skin Types
Maybelline True Illusion Oil-Free Foundation
Neutrogena Healthy Skin liquid foundation


These are examples of currently acceptable cosmetics for use on acne-prone skin. Although they may contain minute amounts of troublesome ingredients, they are small quantities as these products produce acceptable results when applied to the skin.

Problems with Cosmetics and Moisturizers
Results may even vary within a product line. For Example, one person was using Elizabeth Arden's Illusion Foundation, Arden's Velva Cream Mask and Arden's Moisture Oil. The predominant problem was the Arden's Moisture Oil. This could be eliminated from the daily routine without any loss of cosmetic elegance.

Avoid all products that contain ingredients such as laureth-4, isopropyl myristate or acetylated lanolin.

Even acne preparations are suspect.
Our test have turned up many problem ingredients not only in certain cosmetics but also in a number of preparations especially formulated to control acne, ingredients in Retin-A® Cream, Hyton® Desquam-Z® and Zerac® are known to be comedogenic.

The solution
Obviously, the best way to protect your skin from acne is by avoiding cosmetics completely. This, however, is an unattractive, if not impossible, solution for many. We suggest, therefore, a simple liquid make-up of pigments, water, glycerin and /or propylene glycol or loose powders. As a rule, the simpler the cosmetic, the better it is for you.

In Summary
Avoid cosmetics and treatments that contain derivates of lanolin, analogs of isopropyl myristate, laureth-4 and D&C red dyes. Read labels carefully as cosmetic manufacturers change their formulas frequently.

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Old 04-11-2003, 12:57 PM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Lanolin makes my skin freak out. You have to be careful with babies, as well. I was looking at baby wipes to use after I go to the gym to get all of the nastiness off of my face. Most of the brand name baby wipes do not have lanolin in them, but the comparable Target brand does. Babies, with more sensitive skin, could be more sensitive to wipes with lanolin.

Also, the thing about the oil is true. I had problems with acne for years. I even took accutane for 6 months and it came back. All of the "oil free" products didn't seem to help, and some aggravated my skin. Once I started using an all natural moisturizer with essential oils in a jojoba oil base, my skin had time to heal and I only break out occasionally now.

Cosmetic companies are tricky. They know that if they advertise in a certain way, people will think that they'll get faster results. But with acne, it takes a while to break the cycle of the problem. I really think that by keeping the skin clean and bacteria free, and by not using any products that are too harsh (like most "medicated for acne" cosmetics are now), acne can be cured naturally. The skin just needs to find its own balance. Another thing that ticks me off are products formulated for oily skin that just dry it out so it mass produces sebum, causing huge problems. So, essentially, the trick with a drop of oil can even work for oily skins- but only lightly and mostly avoiding the T-zone area. Olive oil works great. Another trick with oil is to mix a tablespoon of it with some sugar into a paste and exfoliate with it. Wash skin with luke warm water and mild natural soap afterwards and it's clean, toned, and moisturised- all in two steps.
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Old 04-11-2003, 04:32 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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We advise any one with Acne to treat their skin as a sensitive.
Using very mild non abrasive products.
If the Acne is deep or hurting at all see your doctor for perscription medicine.

I will take time to really review your recent post Electric.... I have a few thoughts on some of it..

C
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