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Old 01-29-2003, 07:44 AM   #1 (permalink)
 
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My son has had a problem with a rash on his torso for some time.It seems to be really prominent after showering and being overheated.His pediatrician tells me it is fifth disease, the fifth childhood disease after the more common ones such as measles.It is not always there...just certain times.We were told it would go away on it's own in about a month but it persists after a years time....anyone know anything about this?! My younger child has a funky condition too....anywhere he scratches, it develops into welts.It goes away in several hours, but until then it looks like he has been attacked by a large animal with long, sharp claws! The doctor gave it a name, but I don't recall it.He has quite a few allergies in addition to asthma...just wondering if anyone else has run into these problems, or if my children are just freaks! LOL....thanx!!
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Old 01-29-2003, 09:48 AM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Seems like very young child I've every known has had a breakout of Fifth disease. Always in the summer, since heat seems to bring it out. I've never come across one that had regular occurances though. Most just had one or maybe two breakouts that lasted a couple of days. My daughter included. Seems like she was 8ish at the time, though she could have been much younger. I get the years very mixed up now (she's 18)
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Old 01-29-2003, 10:32 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Angeleyes:
Our data shows the following in regards to your question...
Erythema infectiosum, or "fifth disease", is a common infection of childhood caused by a virus.
The term "fifth disease" does not refer to someone named "Fifth", but rather to the fifth of six classic exanthems, or rash-associated diseases, of childhood. The numbering is of historic interest only: the other examthems, in order are first: measles; second: scarlet fever; third: rubella; fourth: "Dukes' disease", which was never clearly distinguished from other rash-producing diseases and is now thought to have been either measles, rubella, scarlet fever, a Staphylococcal infection, or one of several unspecified enteroviral infections; and sixth: roseola.

The virus responsible for erythema infectiosum is parvovirus B19, a virus that lives only in humans. It seems to be transmitted mainly by body fluids, including droplets produced when you cough or sneeze but also including blood.
Symptoms usually appear within 4 days to 2 weeks after exposure, but may take as long as 3 weeks. The virus seems to be less contagious once the rash appears (so children with the rash can go to school or day-care without exposing others).

The most common symptoms of fifth disease are mild cold symptoms and malaise, fever in up to 1/3 of patients, and a rash.
On the body this rash is usually light red and lacy in appearance -- the typical rash does not look like measles, but some pediatricians refer to it as "Hungarian measles". Occasionally a child with this virus has a rash that looks very much like that of rubella, but this is not common. The best-known rash of fifth disease is on the face, which becomes intensely red, especially on the cheeks, with a pale ring around the mouth ("circumoral pallor"). The face looks like the patient's cheeks have been slapped, and the uninitiated may look at a patient with fifth disease and think that the child was slapped across the face. (The child protection workers in the area where I practice are acquainted with fifth disease and its appearance. Good thing, too.) In addition, joint pain can occur: it's relatively rare in kids but more common in adults. Many people (adults and children) are infected with parvovirus B19 and show no symptoms whatever.

Although very rare, parvovirus B19 infection can produce more severe results, including anemia (and aplastic crisis in patients with sickle-cell anemia or other abnormalities of hemoglobin). It is also possible for parvovirus B19 infection during pregnancy to cause "hydrops" (fluid overload and heart failure) in the developing fetus; however, this happens in less than 10% of mothers with proven parvovirus infection in the first trimester (which probably means that the risk is much less than 10%, since many infections go unnoticed). The risk seems to be much lower in the second trimester and may be nonexistent past that point. No one has shown that parvovirus B19 infection during pregnancy is associated with birth defects.

There is presently no vaccine available for parvovirus B19, and no good and simple test for it outside of hospital and research laboratories. Since so many infections occure without any symptoms, people are always at risk of exposure. Like many other viruses, however, once you have been infected you are likely to be immune for life. People who spend a lot of time with children (like other children, as well as teachers, day-care workers, and parents) are more likely to be exposed. Since the virus is so widespread, and since problems with the fetus after an infection are so uncommon, infectious-diease authorities feel that keeping pregnant women away from children or adults known to have the virus will not eliminate the risk of infection. If you are a pregnant woman and find out that you have been exposed to a known or suspected case of fifth disease, you should talk to your obstetrician. Ultrasound may help to detect problems with the fetus should they occur. Children who have the rash may go to school or day care without exposing others further (by the time the rash appears the child is no longer contagious), and good handwashing will help you keep from giving the bug to others.
This information is provided by Dr. Reddy

Hope this helps you out..

Julie and Chris
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Old 01-29-2003, 10:37 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Really? Wow! No one(including me!), around here has ever heard of it.My son wasn't so young with his first outbreak, he was 12.I just can't understand why it keeps reoccuring!!
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Old 01-31-2003, 09:31 AM   #5 (permalink)
 
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As always, thank you for all the great info....that's why I keep coming back !!
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Old 01-31-2003, 11:46 AM   #6 (permalink)
 
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The lasting redness after an abrasion could also be a form of scoriosis.
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Old 02-04-2003, 08:12 AM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Interesting...he has excema, I was told it kind of goes along w/the allergies and asthma...I suppose psoriosis could go along with that as well? I will have to do some research on that one, as well, I guess....thanks, Tan Talker! Does anyone have any experience with either one of these skin diseases, and any recomendations as far as cleansers and lotions?Right now we are using a prescription hydrocrtisone, but it doesn't seem to be touching it.And, believe me, we use plenty of it!I lotion him up several times a day, only having him bathe every other day in tepid water.The excema is concentrated on his knees and elbows.
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Old 02-04-2003, 10:24 AM   #8 (permalink)
 
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Boy do I have experience with Excema. I was both with it 39 years ago. It was severe then and my mother has mentioned several times how she couldn't use the new fangled disposable diapers that had just came out. It was so bad I couldn't even have rubber pants on, only natural fabrics. At that time I was born, the doctors told my mother to always use Neutrogena products on my skin and any detergent but Tide. She used Fab forever. Hyrdocortisone was only available by prescription and I had it by jars at all times. It was the only thing to curtail the rash. I'm sure things have changed a lot since then but I still stay away from Tide and use several Neutogena products.

It ended up concentrating on my arms and hands mainly. It would flare up so bad there were times my hands look like claws. My knuckles are pretty scared up from it to this day. It left the skin very thick and rough.

I started regular indoor tanning about 10 years ago, partly for my Excema, and tanning has actually cured my Excema completely. It took a while though. I'd say I've been break out free for at least 6 years. Even though I tanned outdoors since my teen years, the natural sun never really did much for the excema. Seems only the UV in the tanning bed has helped mine. You may want to consider very light tanning to see if it helps your son.

If you haven't tried them, you may look at Cetaphil products. These were recommended to me as a good alternative water, free cleanser.

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[ This Message was edited by: Luv2BTan on 2003-02-04 10:26 ][ This Message was edited by: Luv2BTan on 2003-02-04 10:26 ]
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Old 02-06-2003, 09:47 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Luv2BTan-thanks so much! Guess what detergent I use?! LOL Wonder if I should change, if if changing would cause an even worse reaction?!I have tried light tanning for both my kids in the spring just to give them a base for the summertime sun.Yes, lotion by the gallons...sounds familiar!Right now we use Dove for Sensitive skin, but I may look into one of the products you mentioned...thanks again!!
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Old 02-14-2003, 06:08 PM   #10 (permalink)
 
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angeleyes...
we have a body wash created by Dr. Corey Rodreguiez and the body wash is a hospital grade.
let me ask Dr. Rodreguiez if she will send you some to try..if it helps you...you may want to carry this in your salon also for your clients.....

Send me your address in a pm and I'll have her send you some to try.

C
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