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Old 04-22-2002, 09:58 PM   #1 (permalink)
 
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Any one have information about a diet high in iodine causing increased photosensitivity?
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Old 04-22-2002, 10:16 PM   #2 (permalink)
 
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Let me ask Eric.. he will probably know about this..
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Old 04-23-2002, 08:03 AM   #3 (permalink)
 
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Tamar,

Actually I am not really sure, I have not heard of this but let me do a like checking for you and I will see what I can come up with.. I am going to attach the Iodine selection from the Natural Medicines Database, which probably is plagiarism, and I absolutely hate just cutting and pasting information with out any further explanation, but that is all I got on this one... I did not see anything with regards to increase sensitivity, but at least here is some more information on the topic. The information explains the sources of most dietary iodine, so even thought this was written as review of a dietary supplement, all the supporting information will apply.

Warning “If you have no interest in Iodine, please move on to the next thread”

Also Known As:
Potassium Iodide, Povidone Iodine.
Scientific Names:
Iodine; I; atomic number 53.
People Use This For:
Orally, iodine is used as an expectorant, for treating endemic goiter, thyroid storm, hyperthyroidism, treating radiation emergency associated with radioactive iodides, cutaneous sporotrichosis, and fibrocystic breast disease. Topically it is used as an antiseptic, for preventing mucositis from chemotherapy, and treating diabetic ulcers.Iodine is also used for water purification.
Safety:
LIKELY SAFE ...when used orally and appropriately. Iodine is safe in amounts that do not exceed 1100 mcg per day, the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) (7135). Higher doses can be safely used therapeutically with appropriate medical monitoring (2197,7080). Advise patients not to use doses greater than the UL without medical supervision. ...when used topically as a 2% solution (15). Iodine is a FDA-approved prescription product.POSSIBLY UNSAFE …when used orally in high doses. Tell patients to avoid prolonged use of doses exceeding the UL of 1100 mcg per day without proper medical supervision. Higher intake can increase the risk of side effects such as thyroid dysfunction (7135).CHILDREN: LIKELY SAFE …when used orally and appropriately (7135). Iodine is safe in amounts that do not exceed the UL of 200 mcg per day for children 1 to 3 years, 300 mcg per day for children 4 to 8 years, 600 mcg per day for children 9 to 13 years, and 900 mcg per day for adolescents (7135). ...when used topically as a 2% solution (15). Iodine is a FDA-approved prescription product. POSSIBLY UNSAFE …when used orally in high doses. Tell patients to avoid prolonged use of doses exceeding the UL of 200 mcg per day for children 1 to 3 years, 300 mcg per day for children 4 to 8 years, 600 mcg per day for children 9 to 13 years, and 900 mcg per day for adolescents (7135). Higher intake can cause thyroid dysfunction (7135).PREGNANCY AND LACTATION: LIKELY SAFE ...when used orally and appropriately. Iodine is safe in amounts that do not exceed the UL of 1100 mcg per day (7135). ...when used topically as a 2% solution (15). Iodine is a FDA-approved prescription product. POSSIBLY UNSAFE …when used orally in high doses. Tell patients to avoid exceeding the UL of 1100 mcg per day or 900 mcg per day for pregnant women ages 14 to 18. Higher intake can cause thyroid dysfunction (7135).
Effectiveness:
EFFECTIVE ...when used orally for treating thyroid storm (15). ...when used orally for radiation emergency associated with radioactive iodides (15,7080). ...when used orally for cutaneous sporotrichosis (15). ...when used orally for hyperthyroidism and endemic goiter (15). ...when used topically as an antiseptic (15). ...when used for water purification (14,15,16).POSSIBLY EFFECTIVE ...when used orally for treating fibrocystic breast disease (2197). ...when used topically for preventing mucositis from chemotherapy (2198,2199). ...when used topically for treating diabetic foot ulcers (2200).There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of iodine for its other uses.
Mechanism of Action:
Iodine is an essential nutrient in humans. About 90% of iodine, which is ingested in a variety of chemical forms, is absorbed (7135). The iodine content of most foods is low and is affected by agricultural factors such as soil quality and climate. Marine animals concentrate iodine from seawater and have a higher content than most other foods (7135). Processed foods may add to dietary iodine due to the addition of iodate to salt.The thyroid gland in humans concentrates iodine for thyroid synthesis. Lesser amounts of iodine are found in the salivary glands, breast, choroid plexus, and gastric mucosa. Iodine is excreted by the kidney (7135). Iodine comprises 65% of thyroxine (T4) and 59% of triiodothyronine (T3). These iodine-rich thyroid hormones control many biochemical reactions, particularly protein synthesis and enzymatic processes. In people with hyperthyroidism, iodine inhibits the release and synthesis of thyroid hormone (15). Iodine deficiency is most devastating on the developing brain (7135). Thyroid hormone is responsible for myelination of the developing central nervous sytem. Iodine deficiency is associated with mental retardation, and in extreme cases, cretinism (7135). Most developed countries, including the US and Canada, screen for hypothryoidsm at birth (7135). The earliest clinical symptom of iodine deficiency is thryoid enlargement (goiter) (7135). Iodide salts, such as potassium iodide, might increase respiratory tract secretions and thereby decrease mucus viscosity, but there is limited supporting evidence for this effect (15). When used topically, iodine oxidizes organic substrates, killing microorganisms (15).
Adverse Reactions:
Orally, iodine can cause marked sensitivity. Symptoms of iodine hypersensitivity are angioedema, cutaneous and mucosal hemorrhage, fever, arthralgia, lymph node enlargement, eosinophilia, urticaria, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and fatal periarteritis (15). Large amounts or chronic use of iodine can cause metallic taste; soreness in teeth and gums; burning in mouth and throat; increased salivation; coryza; sneezing; eye irritation and eyelid swelling; headache; cough; pulmonary edema; swelling of parotid and submaxillary glands; inflammation of the pharynx, larynx and tonsils; acneform skin lesions; gastric upset; diarrhea; anorexia; and depression (14,15,2138). Prolonged use of iodides can cause thyroid gland hyperplasia, thyroid adenoma, goiter, and severe hypothyroidism (15).Topically, iodine may stain skin, irritate tissues, and cause sensitization in some individuals (15). Iodine burns are associated with application of 7% hydroalcoholic solution (15).
Interactions with Herbs & Supplements:
Insufficient reliable information available.
Interactions with Drugs:
AMIODARONE (Cordarone): Amiodarone contains 37.3% iodine. Plasma iodide levels may be increased and additive with iodine supplements (15,7135). Monitor thyroid function.ANTITHYROID DRUGS: Concomitant use may result in additive hypothyroid activity, may cause hypothyroidism (2138).LITHIUM: Concomitant use may have additive or synergistic hypothyroid effects (15).POTASSIUM IODIDE: Concomitant use with potassium-containing products, potassium-sparing diuretics, or ACE inhibitors may cause hyperkalemia (15).
Interactions with Foods:
No interactions are known to occur, and there is no known reason to expect a clinically significant interaction with iodine.
Interactions with Lab Tests:
THYROID VOLUME: The di-iodotyrosine form of iodine can reduce thyroid volume in patients with goiter due to iodine deficiency (14).THYROID HORMONES: Excess iodine intake can result in elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. (7135). Short-term use of potassium iodide can reduce serum thyroid hormone concentrations and test results (14,15).
Interactions with Diseases or Conditions:
AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE (AITD): People with AITD may have increased sensitivity to adverse effects of iodine (7135).THYROID DYSFUNCTION: Prolonged use or excessive amounts of iodides may cause or exacerbate thyroid gland hyperplasia, thyroid adenoma, goiter, and hypothyroidism (14,15).
Dosage/Administration:
ORAL: For fibrocystic breast disease, 80 mcg/kg molecular iodine has been used (2197). The National Institute of Medicine has set Adequate Intake (AI) of iodine for infants: 0 to 6 months, 110 mcg/day; 7 to 12 months, 130 mcg/day (7135). For children and adults, Recommended Dietary Amounts (RDA) have been set: children 1 to 8 years, 90 mcg/day; 9 to 13 years, 120 mcg/day; people age 14 and older, 150 mcg/day (7135). For pregnant women, the RDA is 209 mcg/day, and breast-feeding women, 290 mcg/day (7135). Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL) for iodine intake have been set: children 1 to 3 years, 200 mcg/day; 4 to 8 years, 300 mcg/day; 9 to 13 years, 600 mcg/day; 14 to 18 years (including pregnancy and lactation), 900 mcg/day. For adults older than age 19 including pregnant and breast-feeding women, the UL is 1100 mcg/day (7135).TOPICAL: Antiseptic, 2% aqueous solution applied to affected skin areas (15). Preventing mucositis from chemotherapy, rinse mouth with povidone iodine solution 4 times daily (2198,2199). Treating diabetic foot ulcers, 0.9% iodine ointment (2200). CAUTION: Avoid occluding skin areas treated with iodine to reduce risk of iodine burn (15).OTHER: Water purification, 3-10 drops tincture of iodine added to water (14).
Comments:
Iodine deficiency is a common world health problem (7135). Early in the twentieth century, iodine deficiency was common in the US and Canada, but the addition of iodine to salt has improved public health. The addition of potassium iodide at 100 ppm, or 76 mg of iodine per kg of salt, is mandatory in Canada, and iodized salt is used optionally by half of the US population (7135).


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Formulated Solutions
1776 11th Ave North
Saint Petersburg, FL 33713
etdann@formulatedsolutions.com
Tanning Division: Technique Laboratories
Salon Products, Sold Only Through Salons[ This Message was edited by: Formulated Solutions on 2002-04-23 08:05 ]
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Old 04-23-2002, 10:00 AM   #4 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
On 2002-04-23 08:03, Formulated Solutions wrote:
(15).Topically, iodine may stain skin, irritate tissues, and cause sensitization in some individuals

To sum it up, the answer is above.
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Old 04-23-2002, 10:29 PM   #5 (permalink)
 
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I'm no doctor, but I do think scientifically, so to speak. The reason I brought this subject up is because I have a customer that tanned with us for several months, stopped for a while, then signed back up. When she started tanning again, she developed bumps that were not quite blisters. We ruled out everything we could to find out why this was happening (why now, not previously?).

In a discussion with another client/friend, I mentioned this and she informed me that while on a cruise she did develop outright blisters (and severe sunburn) and had to visit the ship's doctor. The doctor told her that the extra iodine (from saltwater fish/shrimp served on board) and the iodine solution her sister-in-law was providing for their on-deck tanning sessions were creating the problem.

So, my un-medically-trained theory is that many people may be somewhat predisposed to outbreaks (pre-blisters, if you will) if their diet is high in iodine. So many of our foods have high sodium content, then add seafood, and iodized table salt or sea salt, and, well...who knows?

It was the third person that I discussed this with that prompted me to ask in this forum. She stated yesterday morning that when she starts tanning every spring, her hands will develop "bumps, pre-blistering", then go away. How odd, I thought.

Last night I had a mom bring in her daughter to sign up and she stated she (Mom) burns/blisters too easily (last season) to sign up this year. After discussing the iodine theory, she stated they do eat a lot of seafood, and...well? I went through the whole thing with her too, because she really shouldn't burn easily (she is olive, like me), so she did go ahead and sign up too, this afternoon.

The cruiser (that visited the doctor on board) brought a friend in today (fair skinned, started tanning over a month ago) and discussed this issue again this afternoon. Her friend showed me small bumps on each elbow!

Not sure what to say, just thought I'd discuss this in an FYI manner and see if anyone else had thoughts, experiences with anything like this. None of this is enough to make the clients quit tanning, just cause for slight concern and questions I can't always answer.

Our society was once iodine deficient, but are we now? This has me a little stumped. I had to whoop out my old nutrition books today. All comments welcome.

Eric, thanks for the info. I love reading that stuff, even though I have to read it twice, lol.
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Old 04-24-2002, 02:19 PM   #6 (permalink)
 
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I have heard that diets high in Iodine can aggravate the skin, and lead to breakouts.
I just heard it from somewhere, anybody else agree...???

~meltdbutta~
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Old 04-24-2002, 06:37 PM   #7 (permalink)
 
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Quote:
On 2002-04-23 10:00, tangirl wrote:
Quote:
On 2002-04-23 08:03, Formulated Solutions wrote:
(15).Topically, iodine may stain skin, irritate tissues, and cause sensitization in some individuals

To sum it up, the answer is above.


Topically meaning applied to the skin. My question relates to ingestion. (I just love busting her on stuff like this.)
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Old 04-24-2002, 08:23 PM   #8 (permalink)
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The tanning salon I used to go to let me tan with baby oil and iodine in the sundome and it didnt make me burn at all actually I got pretty dark.
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Old 04-25-2002, 06:23 AM   #9 (permalink)
 
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Baybbunz
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Posted: 4/24/02 8:23p
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The tanning salon I used to go to let me tan with baby oil and iodine in the sundome and it didnt make me burn at all actually I got pretty dark.










THis is crazyness..
Is this a truthful post? or just being silly?

Someone help me out with this statement please..

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This is insane.. You can not call that Chop Shop you went to a salon.
If they did what you said they did, (baby oil and iodine ) Then they would be classified as a Chop Shop/hobbist.
Okk I would like to know as well why would you put that stuff on your skin?
Mj

[ This Message was edited by: MJ on 2002-04-25 09:28 ]
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Old 04-25-2002, 06:48 AM   #10 (permalink)
 
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Are you aware of exactly how harmful that practice is? It's like me saying "I drank a quart of brown liquor every day while pregnant with all my kids and they turned out just fine."

Quote:
On 2002-04-24 20:23, Baybbunz wrote:
The tanning salon I used to go to let me tan with baby oil and iodine in the sundome and it didnt make me burn at all actually I got pretty dark.
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